Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Defending Why I Call My Son the King -- VIDEO

I recorded the video below this evening on my drive home.

In the video I explain and defend why I call my autistic son the king, which is sometimes short for "King Sh-t"

LANGUAGE WARNING:  I say the actual word in the video:




I hope that video clears things up a bit!  :-)

Also, here's links to 3 older blog posts that I wrote awhile back that give several examples of  why & when we call him King Sh-t.  I guess these were the ones that some people took offense to.

smile emoticon

POST #2

POST #3

But now after hearing my explanation in the video, do you find the nickname king or King Sh-t offensive?


8 comments:

  1. Hahaha. I hadn't read any of those posts before, so I thought this was going to be a reference to fecal smearing (which we experience anywhere from monthly to hourly in our house).

    I know I for one use a few terms of endearment that might be offensive to someone not living in our house. But that's the point, the outsiders don't live in my house, they don't know my tone, my intent, or my family at all. I HAVE wondered if my son can understand my sarcasm though. Since he's non-verbal, I just don't know. He may believe he's actually a large green booger, since that's my most frequent name for him when he's smearing, or refusing to comply, or just being so cute I can't stand it. In that same vein, I also tell all three of my children that I'm going to "eat their faces" on the daily (followed by a flurry of kisses all over their faces), so who can say what he thinks of that one.

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  2. Makes perfect sense now. People probably just didn't understand your family dynamic. So much gets lost in translation over the web. I know it takes 1000 positive comments to offset each negative one, which can sit there and fester if you let them. But please know that you make a huge difference and are such a good dad! The king is a lucky royalty to have such loving parents (with a good sense of humor). Don't let the trolls of the world take up any of your head space. They're not worth it. Their parents should have ball busted them as kids, so they could have developed a good sense of humor instead of a stick up their butts.

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  3. I think it’s great. If you don’t have humor, what do you have? People are always going to have a problem with something you do –so don’t let it get to you. You both do a great job with your son (despite the circumstances) keep it up, ball busting and all :)

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  4. I always read your use of the term, "the king," as humorous. What parent doesn't feel like their kid or kids rule the house? And, I agree; it isn't an autism thing; it's a kid/parenting thing. When you're a devoted parent, it feels like you always put your kid first and you're always looking after their needs before your own, --probably because you are!! My mom used to call me "your majesty" when I was acting entitled as a kid. It was her way of saying, "hey, knock it off." I love the autism community, but we can be a little too touchy about things.

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  5. Very sad that your family called you names also. Sorry, it's very low class but not surprising for the Jersey/New York area.

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  6. Wow, that is a mean comment (by Anonymous above). Using nicknames and joking around is common to all families, knucklehead!!

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  7. This nickname is totally fine with me. Autism parents are still allowed to be full human beings, and I am confident Autism Daddy is doing the most difficult and heartbreaking jobs in the world. A regional difference, my Louisiana household calls my severely ASD son "Stinker." No difference, really.

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  8. Alice mom to severe twinsJune 7, 2016 at 2:05 PM

    You call him what you want to call him! According to me. We call our twins King Henry the Eighth when one will take a tiny sip of a drink, slowly pour the rest of the drink on the floor and then fling the cup.

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